CURRICULUM VITAE

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Stephanie L. Canizales, PhD
University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Sociology

School of Social Science, Humanities, and Arts
University of California at Merced
Merced, CA 95343

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, UC Merced, 2020-
Postdoctoral Scholar, Department of Sociology, UC Merced, 2019-2020
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Texas A&M University, 2018-2019

EDUCATION
PhD, Sociology, University of Southern California, 2018
M.A., Sociology, University of Southern California, 2013
B.A., Political Science, University of California, Los Angeles, 2011

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES, REPORTS, and OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2019. “Measures to Lessen US-Mexican Crossings Put Migrants in Greater Danger.” The Globe Post. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. and Samuel de Leon. 2019. “The uncontained violence against unaccompanied Central American minor migrants in the U.S.” Youth Circulations. Available here.

*Republished by the USC Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2018. “US Service Providers Race Against Time as Immigration Policy Shifts.” The Globe Post. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2018. “Young people crossing the border alone face challenges in the US homes where they’re placed.” The Conversation. Available here.

Pressman, Steven, Greg Wright, and Stephanie L. Canizales. 2018. “3 key quotes from Trump’s first State of the Union, explained.” The Conversation. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2018. “Support and setback: The Role of Religion in the Incorporation of Unaccompanied Indigenous Youth in Los Angeles.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. Available here.

  • Winner of the American Sociological Association Section on Latina/o Sociology Cristina Maria Riegos Student Paper Award, 2018.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2017. “Rescinding DACA: The children are watching.” The Globe Post. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2017. “How unaccompanied youth become exploited workers in the U.S.” Opinion editorial. The Conversation. Available here.

Agius Vallejo, Jody and Stephanie L. Canizales. 2016. “Latino/a professionals as entrepreneurs: how race, class, and gender shape entrepreneurial incorporation.” Ethnic and Racial Studies. DOI:10.1080/01419870.2015.1126329. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2016. “Support and Setback: Catholic Churches and the Adaptation of Unaccompanied Guatemalan Maya Youth in Los Angeles.” Center for Migration Studies- New York. Available here.

Agius Vallejo, Jody and Stephanie L. Canizales. 2016. Review of “National Colors: Racial Classification and the State in Latin America” by Mara Loveman. American Journal of Sociology 21(4): 1294-1296.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2015. “American individualism and the social incorporation of Guatemalan Maya young adults in Los Angeles.” Ethnic and Racial Studies. DOI: 10.1080/01419870.2015.1021263. Available here.

  • Winner of the American Sociological Association Section on Latina/o Sociology Distinguished Contribution to Research Article Award, 2017.
  • Winner of the American Sociological Association Section on International Migration Aristide Zolberg Student Scholar Award Honorable Mention, 2014.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2015. “Fast Fashion, Slow Integration: Guatemalan youth navigate life and labor in Los Angeles.” Youth Circulations, Lauren Heidbrink and Michele Statz (Eds.). Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2015. “Unaccompanied Migrant Children: A Humanitarian Crisis at the Border and Beyond.”  UC Davis Center for Poverty Research. Available here.

Suro, Roberto, Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco, and Stephanie L. Canizales. 2015. “Removing Insecurity: Who American Children Will Benefit from President Obama’s Executive Action on Immigration.” Tomas Rivera Policy Institute at USC and the Institute for Immigration, Globalization, and Education at UCLA. Available here.

* Cited as evidence in brief filed with the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, April 2015

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2014. “Life for child migrants is even harder beyond the US border.” The Conversation. Available here.

Canizales, Stephanie L. 2014. “Exploitation, Poverty and Marginality among Unaccompanied Migrant Youth.” UC Davis Center for Poverty Research. Available here.

RESEARCH
Fellowships + Awards
University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellowship. University of California at Merced, 2019-2020.

Emerging Poverty Scholars Fellowship. Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2018-2019.

Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. Ford Foundation, 2017-2018.

Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. Haynes Lindley Foundation, 2016-2017.

Minority Fellowship Program. American Sociological Association (Co-Sponsored   by Sociologist for Women in Society), 2016-2017.

Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant. National Science Foundation Sociology Program, 2015-2016.

Graduate School Endowed Fellowship. University of Southern California, 2015-2016.

Maria Elena Martinez Summer Fieldwork Research Grant. USC Latin American and Latino Studies Program, 2015.

College 2020 Graduate Summer Research Stipend. University of Southern California Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, 2014.

Hispanic Poverty, Inequality, and Mobility Research Fellowship. Stanford University Center on Poverty and Inequality, 2013.

Center for Poverty Research Visiting Scholar. University of California at Davis, 2013.

Research Experience
Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration, University of Southern California, Research Assistant, 2015.

Program for Environmental and Regional Equity, University of Southern California, Research Assistant, 2014-2015.

Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, University of Southern California, Research Assistant, 2013-2017.

Department of Sociology, University of Southern California, Research Assistant to Jody Agius Vallejo, 2011-2018.

Professional Development
Spectrum of Migrant Exclusions: An Interdisciplinary Workshop. University of Toronto, Canada, 2018.

International Migration, Integration, and Social Cohesion Summer School Program (IMISCOE), Princeton University, 2016.

SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION
American Sociological Association International Migration Section Graduate Student Representative, 2017-2018.

American Sociological Association Latina/o Sociology Section Graduate Student Representative, 2015-2017

Manuscript Referee
Ethnic and Racial Studies; Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies; Law and Society; Social Problems; Social Services Review; Oxford University Press; Qualitative Sociology

MEDIA AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Quoted in, “The Thousands of Children Who Go to Immigration Court Alone.” The Atlantic, 8/2018.

Interviewed for, “Immigration”, KPFK Soul Rebel Radio, 7/2018.

Quoted in, “La cancelación del TPS salvadoreño es ilógica y contraria a los intereses estadounidenses en América Latina.” La Opinión, 1/2018.

30 Top Thinkers Under 30, Pacific Standard Magazine, 2016.

Quoted in, “When Migrant Kids Become Homeless,” Al Jazeera America, 11/2015.

Quoted in, “Young immigrants placed in sponsor homes are at risk of abuse, experts say,” LA Times, 08/2015.

Research featured in, “Young, undocumented, and invisible,” Pacific Standard Magazine, 8/2014.

Interviewed for, “Where unaccompanied minors go when they immigrate to LA”, KPCC Take Two, 9/2014.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
American Sociological Association
Latin American Studies Association
Latina/o Studies Association
Pacific Sociological Association
Society for the Study of Social Problems
Scholars Strategy Network

______________
Header photo shows mural titled “67 Sueños” by Pancho Pescador in collaboration with the Community Rejuvenation Project in San Francisco, which draws attention to the 67% of undocumented youth neglected by U.S. immigration policy.

 

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